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WHAT, NO WALL SPACE?

If you are a woodworker then you are probably aware of that unwritten but scientific law that states "no matter how large your workshop you will not have enough space". I have spent endless hours re-arranging my workshop (single garage) in that elusive quest to place machinery in the optimum space and yet keep access simple. One tool that demands wall space is the WoodRat. On this site you will find some other mounting methods and Pierre Veuger has sent me some photos of Piet Spijkstra,s workshop. He has two fixing systems that may give you some ideas. If you have travelled to one of the Axminster or WoodRat shows then you may well have met Pierre and Piet who often travel over from Holland.

First some pictures of Piet's rack system.

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I don't have a detailed description but here Piet appears to have made clever use of a rack and shelf support system. I am guessing that he has welded on the lower foot supports onto the vertical legs. (yes he did) Anglepoise lamp and dust removal from the rear.

Clear space underneath  makes it easy to store over other equipment when not needed.

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The top back board looks very substantial and I doubt if there is any  sideways flex at all. The shelf at the rear is very useful for all the 'Rat bits and of course is adjustable up and down on the shelf brackets.

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Rear view displays the dust removal pipe and neat way of storing the power cord. This prevents any tripping hazard.

Piet's Roof mount system

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If you have enough headroom in your workshop then you can mount from above on a hinged frame which can be raised up and chained out of the way. Proximity to a solid vertical wall or cupboard is needed to fix the mount when lowered though. Its a simple plywood frame fixed to the rafters with a strong batten and hinges.

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Piet uses substantial screw eyes and chain to fix the frame in up position. Would give you a surprise if it unexpectedly came down! I can see a pulley on the joist but I don't know if the original plan was to lift it by rope.

Update: No the pulleys are for suspending a push bike.

border="0" Here is a close-up the holding method.
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Raising the frame with the WoodRat on its mounts. It must surely require a lower fixing to prevent it from becoming detached. Is that orange lever? to do that Piet?

Is it an optical illusion or is the plate not square? The 'Rat is not lightweight and so you need to be strong to lift it like that. A pulley system would be best for me.

Update: Assured the plate is square. The orange bit is the parallelogram!

 

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The raised frame without the 'Rat on it. The simple construction is clear to see. For extra confidence I think I would prefer to use bigger strap hinges so that I cold fix it with bolts rather than screws.

border="0" When dropped down the frame is held in position with two steel bars. These bars locate into the screw eyes on the rear of the frame.
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Here it is down and all ready to go. I am assuming that the router and fixing plate are removed and stored elsewhere  before raising the frame and WoodRat up into the roof-space, although it could be locked on with a star knob.

This method clearly is a way to maximise floor and wall space if your workshop has enough height.

Pierre and Piet, thanks for sharing your ideas with us.


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18/03/2012